Gitelman and Rankine Juxtaposed

Recently, URI hosted two impressive yet different scholars: Lisa Gitelman, professor of English and Media, Culture, and Communication at NYU, and Claudia Rankine, writer and professor of poetry at Yale. Each spoke to their area of interest; Gitelman discussed how shoes are a metaphor for the industrial revolution and Rankine talked about flipping the script on our expectations of representation based on race, gender, and intersectional identity. Moving between these two talks, from the material product to the representational identity, was a juxtaposition that made both of the talks even more enlightening for me.

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Nic Schumann discusses Non-traditional Career Opportunities

The final installment of  “Non-traditional Career Opportunities for Students in Humanities and Social Sciences” on April 19th featured Nic Schumann, co-founder and COO of Work-Shop Design Studio. Focusing on digital skills and entrepreneurship, Schumann was a wonderful speaker on this topic who identifies primarily as an entrepreneur rather than considering himself as limited to one field or discipline. Throughout the talk, he asked thoughtful questions and gave broad advice that provided insight into the employer’s side of hiring and retaining the best colleagues. Continue reading “Nic Schumann discusses Non-traditional Career Opportunities”

Lisa Carnevale at Non-traditional Career Speaker Series

The “Non-traditional Career Opportunities for Students in Humanities and Social Sciences” Speaker Series organized by URI librarian Bohyun Kim continued with Lisa Carnevale, co-founder and executive director of DESIGNxRI, on March 29th, 2018. This organization works to share information about the design sector in RI, create an environment for design businesses to thrive, and make grants to these designers and businesses. To support this mission DESIGNxRI runs programs, maintains a directory, and holds events, such as Design Week. Carnevale earned her degree in communications and since then has used her passion and interests in the arts and design to guide her career in the nonprofit sector.

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Andrea Russo at Non-traditional Career Speaker Series

URI librarian Bohyun Kim’s speaker series “ Non-traditional Career Opportunities for Students in Humanities and Social Sciences” recently hosted Andrea Russo on March 15th as the second presenter in a series of four. Russo visited Carother’s Library from her current position as the regional manager of Rhode Island for TEALS, an organization with the goal of bringing computer science programs to every high school. Russo’s presentation was essentially an autobiographical exercise, but showed the audience how your career path doesn’t necessarily need to follow a conventional or expected sequence.

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Non-traditional Career Opportunities for Students in Humanities and Social Sciences Speaker Series

The library has introduced a new speaker series in “Non-traditional Career Opportunities for Students in Humanities and Social Sciences” this semester. Organized by Bohyun Kim, Scholarly Technology Librarian, this series aims to help students of all levels explore working in fields that are not necessarily directly associated with the Humanities or Social Sciences. 

The first session was Thursday, Feb. 22 with Assistant Professor Karl Aspelund of the Textiles, Fashion Merchandising and Design Department, with three more sessions to come. I attended this first session and thought that Dr. Aspelund’s talk was very interesting and the whole speaker-series project seems extremely pertinent to the current humanities job market.

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Write Now: Genres of Writing – Opportunities for Self-Transformation

The Center for Humanities (CFH) hosted “Write Now: Genres of Writing – Opportunities for Self-Transformation” on Dec. 12, 2017. This workshop, geared towards junior faculty and graduate students, offered attendees the opportunity to rethink our relationship with writing so that it can become a more generative and productive practice. Rather than focusing solely on our output as academic writers, we were asked to consider our practices and the different types of writing we engage in to find more enjoyment in this task, allowing for exploration and aiding in clarifying ideas.

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A Conversation with Laura Marie Marciano

Laura is a 4th year PhD student working on a creative dissertation in Poetry in the English department at the University of Rhode Island. She came to pursue her PhD having completed an MFA in Performance and Interactive Media from CUNY Brooklyn. Laura is involved both on-campus and off in fostering a creative writing community, as well as teaching and publishing her own poetry and that of others. She curates Gemstone Readings in the NYC area, incorporating performance elements in non-traditional venues and heads the Literary Arts Committee at URI, which hosts readings among other projects focused on students pursuing the creative dissertation option. [br]

We reached out to her to talk more about her work and specifically LAMM presents at Artbook @ MoMA PS1, an exhibition series she is co-curating, which premiers Sunday, December 10 at 4pm at MoMA PS1.

You have an experiential poetry event at MoMA PS1 this month, what are the aims of this event? In this vein, how does experiential poetry differ from a reading or other live event? [br] 

The event at MoMA PS1 and Artbook is part of a new venture project, LAMM, in which my long time friend and fellow poet, Monica McClure, and I explore what it is like to create immersive poetry events within an institutional space, and also, consider how capital, commerce, and popular culture can effect the way poetry is experienced.[br]
Monica and I came together through my project gemstone readings. We want to evolve from the project, and transition to a different model that negotiates with mainstream culture rather than resists it altogether. We both come from humble, down-home backgrounds, have an affinity for fashion and design, and share very similar aesthetic tastes, which make the project easier to navigate with little conflict.

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Reflections on the Ocean State Writing Conference

The University of Rhode Island English department has hosted the Ocean State Writing Conference for the last eleven years. This distinguished event is planned and coordinated yearly by the creative writing faculty, Mary Cappello, Peter Covino, Derek Nikitas, Jody Lisberger, the conference director, the wonderful Tina Egnoski this year, and the conference administrative director, Michelle Carraccia.  In addition, many graduate students volunteer each year with both the preparation and in helping the conference run smoothly for attendees, from registration to cleaning up after workshops and panels. This year we asked several of the graduate students who volunteered and attended workshop sessions with our featured writers about their experiences.

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Testing Literature and Producing Knowledge in Moby-Dick

On October 3, 2017 the English department welcomed Dr. Maurice S. Lee of Boston leeUniversity to present his lecture titled “Testing Literature and Producing Knowledge in Moby-Dick.” Dr. Lee is currently the Hilles Bush Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University and is exploring the connections between 19th century literature and that period’s information revolution. His current project, Overwhelming Words: Literature, Aesthetics, and the 19th-Century Information Revolution, informed his talk at URI.

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