All posts by Ashton Foley

A Talk by Dr. Jane Goodall: Tomorrow & Beyond

goodall1On September 19, 2017, hundreds of people packed the Ryan Center to hear primatologist and legend Jane Goodall speak. Goodall, who is most well known for her work with chimpanzees in Tanzania, gave a captivating talk as part of the URI Honors Colloquium, whose theme this year is Origins: Life, the Universe and Everything. The talk began with Goodall describing her childhood, as she became fascinated with animals and nature at a very young age. She credits her mother with fostering this love of nature, and encouraging Goodall to pursue a career outside of the limits set for women in the 1940s and 1950s. Goodall described her first job in the field of primatology as one happening by chance as she visited a friend in Tanzania and was introduced to archaeologist Louis Leakey. This first assignment proved groundbreaking, and after receiving a doctorate from Newnham College at Cambridge University (without even having a bachelors first!), Goodallcontinued challenging contemporary thoughts about primates. Among her discoveries was that she realized chimpanzees have social hierarchies and can have violent tendencies, but also exhibit instances of benevolence, all of which are characteristics of humans and human society.goodall2

The parting message Goodall offered was one of hope and a call to action. After her work strictly with primates, Goodall began interacting with native people near the preserve where she was working. Her goal was to help them improve their own lives so that, when not worried about basic survival themselves, they could focus on protecting the natural resources around them. She started the program Roots & Shoots, which has now become largely a school-based environmental education program. Their mission is “to foster respect and compassion for all living things, to promote understanding of all cultures and beliefs, and to inspire each individual to take action to make the world a better place for people, other animals, and the environment” (Roots & Shoots). Children and adolescents are learning the importance of changing our mindsets and habits in order to slow, and hopefully reverse, global warming and its effects. Goodall encouraged each person in the audience to take some type of action toward protecting and renewing our environment, as one individual’s actions combined with millions of others will make a difference.

To watch a video of Dr. Goodall’s talk, go here: 

http://stream.uri.edu/archived-events/2017-uri-honors-colloquium/

For more info on Roots & Shoots: https://www.rootsandshoots.org/aboutus.

Constructing Femininity: Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Material Culture, and the OED

clip_art_library_books89143630_stdHave you ever looked up a word in the OED, and come across a first-use quotation from your favorite author? Well, if your favorite author happens to be Victorian writer Mary Elizabeth Braddon, you would experience this feeling of surprise quite frequently.

In her March 25, 2015 talk entitled “Constructing Femininity: Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Material Culture, and the OED,” PhD candidate Anna Brecke spoke about Braddon’s lasting mark on the English language. Although most widely known as the author of Lady Audley’s Secret, Braddon was a prolific writer of sensation in the 1860s, penning more than 150 novels and short stories, nine plays, and countless poems and other scholarly writings over the span of her forty-year career, becoming the sixth most cited female author in the OED at present. Brecke’s talk drew examples from three of Braddon’s lesser-known novels, Asphodel, Mount Royal, and Vixen, where words abound that Braddon herself either coined or utilized in a new way. These words run the gamut from abstruse anachronisms to commonplace contemporary terms. Words currently in disuse like “horsiness” and “dogginess” were used by Braddon in describing the habits of female characters as liking the outdoors or enjoying hunting. Braddon in fact refers to the “horsiness” of her own activities in her diaries, which, Brecke interestingly points out, focus more on horses and riding than they do on people. Braddon’s novels utilize these and similar terms as a way to distinguish her “natural heroines” from the commodified girl culture that was often pressed in social circles and popular culture. It is here in her connection to material culture that Braddon’s mark on the English language can best be seen.

Drawing on her work in the Mary Elizabeth Braddon Archive held at the International Center for Victorian Women Writers (ICVWW) in Canterbury Christ Church University, England, Brecke spoke to the apparent preoccupation with issues of appearance and social expectations of dress voiced in Braddon’s works. Brecke recognized a theme of materiality in Braddon’s terms, pointing to the abundance of words that relate to material culture, specifically fashion, fabric, or clothing, that make up the over 1,400 OED entries in which Braddon is cited. The novel Vixen is cited for the first use of the word “fashion magazine” in print, while the term “chic” cites Mount Royal as an instance of first use for its meaning. The third text Brecke discussed, Asphodel, boasts “aglitter,” “fad,” and among its contributions to the English language. The female characters of Braddon’s texts use this specialized fashion vocabulary as a way to consume girl culture being broadcasted in the very magazines Braddon names. Brecke’s talk included pictures of Victorian fashion plates, or drawings of the most popular clothing styles of the time, similar to those that characters in a Braddon may have themselves looked upon.

Although Braddon’s project may not have been to propagate and encourage girl culture, her contributions to the world of material culture—particularly fashion—are astonishing. As Brecke pointed out in her question and answer session, there is certainly a doubleness to Braddon’s use of the terms, where successful heroines find moderation between consumer culture and anti-consumerism tendencies. Brecke’s talk served to highlight this lesser-known author whose contributions to the English language are impressive and astonishing, and whose influence stretches beyond the literary page.

Upcoming Graduate Student Conference

With just two weeks to go, preparations for the 8th Annual Graduate Student Conference are well underway. This year’s conference is themed “Opening Spaces: Enabling Engagement with Complex Conversations,” inviting interdisciplinary dialogue from various departments at URI and beyond. Led by Jenna Morton-Aiken, second year Ph.D. student in Writing and Rhetoric at URI, the conference committee has vetted abstracts and proposals, and arranged panels with far-reaching topics. From discussions on mental health in literature to the impact of media on stand-up comedy, from conversations about the utility of video games in academia to exploring environmental practices in hotels, this year’s panels offer something for everyone in this smorgasbord of intellectual conversation.

In addition to the impressive student panels, the accomplished Reverend Dr. L. Weldon Palmer will deliver the keynote address. Reverend Palmer’s own scholarly and professional work spans difficult conversations; with a concentration in religious ethics and American religious traditions in his doctoral work, Reverend Palmer has also co-authored interdisciplinary studies in neonatology, geriatrics and gerontology, and biomedical experimentation.

As plenary speakers, this year’s conference will feature two of URI’s own esteemed professors: Dr. Jose Amador from the Department of Natural Resources Science and Dr. Libby Miles from the Department of Writing and Rhetoric. Professors Amador and Miles recently co-taught an honors-level course on communicating science to the public.

Registration is currently open for the Graduate Conference! Please visit the Graduate Conference website for further details. The conference takes place on Saturday, March 29, 2014.